Latest News

Read Past Latest News Here

September 19, 2022

SavetheDate-InfoSoon.png
Golf Poster 2022-4a-.png

Letter from our Vice President

I know the AHPA Convention seems like a long time away but November 29 - December 3 will be here soon. This year’s convention will be at the Westin La Paloma Resort and Spa in Tucson, AZ. This is a beautiful hotel located at the edge of the Catalina mountains. In addition to the restaurants and amenities on site, the hotel is just a 5-minute drive from shopping and restaurants. The hotel has 10,000 feet of vendor space available, and I know Cassie will be sending out the standard vendor information soon. 

 

I think this is going to be a great convention and I’m excited to tell you about this year’s additional activity.  We’re hosting a golf tournament on November 29th!   The La Paloma Country Club (part of the resort) is a semi-private club that only allows its members and guests of the Resort to play its three 9-hole golf courses designed by Jack Nicklaus.  It’s a beautiful and extremely well-maintained course in the beautiful Sonoran Desert near the Catalina mountains.

 

This is a great opportunity to show your support for the AHPA and help us raise money for the antidumping legal fees. This will also be a great opportunity for members of your organization to get better acquainted with some of the AHPA members.

 

This will be an 18-hole 2-man scramble event starting at 1:00 PM on November 29th. The entry fee for individual players is $200 and includes use of the practice range, green fees with a cart (1 cart/team), and a player’s gift that includes golf balls. There will also be a hole-in-one contest with winners choice of forklift (HummberBee or Bobcat).  Prizes for 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place teams will be awarded, (depending on the total number of players). All proceeds will go to the AHPA Antidumping fund.

 

The AHPA cannot do this without your help, so we are asking you to participate in several ways.

  1. We need golfers.

  2. We need sponsors to cover the prizes

  3. We need sponsors to promote this activity.

 

Of course, we will always accept donations of any amount to the Antidumping fund and ask that you do what you can to support the industry that supports your business. 

 

We have several options available for you to sponsor the tournament.

 1. Corporate Sponsorship $1500 which includes:

  • 1 Custom Banner displayed during Tournament and AHPA Convention 

  • 1 Custom Pin Flag

  • Ads on GPS screen in golf cart

  • Ads on AHPA website and convention program

  • Company logo on the event banner

  • Entry fee for 3 players 

 

2. Business Sponsorship $1000 which includes:

  • 1 Custom Tee box sign (18”x24”) during Tournament and AHPA Convention

  • 1 Custom Pin Flag (alternate hole from tee sign) 

  • Ads on AHPA convention program

  • Company logo on the event banner

  • Entry fee for 2 players

 

3. Executive Sponsorships $500 includes your choice of one of the following:

  • 1 Custom Tee Box Sign 18"x24" displayed at Tee box

  • 1 Custom Pin Flag 24” x 14” flag can be attached to the pin at all golf courses in the US

  • Company logo on the event banner

 

4. Closest to the Pin Guaranteed Winner $300

  • 1 Custom Sign

  • Ad in AHPA Convention program

  • Winner receives 2 VIP Tickets for choice of NFL; MLB; NBA; NHL; College Sports; Concerts; Broadway shows; Musicals and more.

5. Individual Player

  • 18-Holes with Cart (one cart per team)

  • 6 Golf balls

  • GPS Equipped Cart

  • Two Person Scramble Format (no Professionals)

  • Chance to win a forklift (hole-in-one contest) 

  • Additional prizes 

 

The deadline for sponsors and players is October 4, 2022.   Please go to AHPA Antidumping Fund Golf Tournament (perfectgolfevent.com)  to register for the tournament. 

 

 

No matter the size your business, organization, or your skill level, we need your participation.

 

Please let me know if you have any questions.

 

Regards,

Steven Coy

AHPA Vice President

stevencoy@ahpanet.com

601-530-6440

NHBNewsHeader.jpg

USDA Honey Outlook Report:
U.S. Demand for Honey Hits All-Time High

 

The USDA has published its annual Honey Outlook Report, and the news is overwhelmingly positive. The United States is the second largest honey consumer behind China, according to the latest data available from the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization in 2019. And in 2021, consumption reached a new record high of 618 million pounds, up 8 percent from the previous year. 


The previous record was 596 million pounds in 2017. Between 1991 and 2021, the average rate of growth has been 10.7 million pounds per year. This translates to about 1.9 pounds per capita of honey consumption in 2021 compared with 1.2 pounds per capita in the early 1990s. The growth in demand, in part due to the growing population, has also been attributed to consumers’ association of honey as a “superfood”—along with garlic, ginger and turmeric—and perception of honey being a healthy sweetener.
 
According to the Honey Outlook Report, the national average price paid to honey producers in 2021 was $2.54 per pound, up from last year’s $2.10. This is now the highest price, surpassing 2018’s record-high price of $2.21. Prices in 2021 were higher than 2020 by 23 to 28 percent in the top 3 producing states and by 8 percent in the rest of the states. Read the full report 
here

USDAAMSLogo.jpg

Honey Industry Votes to Continue the Research and Promotion Program

Date September 08, 2022

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) today announced that U.S. honey first handlers and importers have approved continuing the National Honey Board research and promotion program.

In the referendum, 73.8% of first handlers and importers voting, who represented 85.5% of the volume of honey or honey products voting in the referendum, were in favor of continuing the program. Over 50% of the first handlers and importers voting and over 50% of the volume voting in the referendum were required for the program to continue.

To be eligible to participate in the referendum, first handlers and importers had to handle or import at least 250,000 pounds of honey or honey products during the representative period of Jan. 1 through Dec. 31, 2021, and be subject to assessments under the program.

The Honey Packers and Importers Research, Promotion, Consumer Education and Industry Information Order, which has been administered by the National Honey Board since 2008, requires USDA to conduct a referendum every seven years to determine whether the industry is in favor of continuing the program. For the program to continue, first handlers and importers had to approve the program by a majority of handlers and importers voting in the referendum, who also represent a majority of the volume represented in the referendum.

The honey research and promotion program is authorized under the Commodity Promotion, Research and Information Act of 1996. The program was developed to administer an effective and coordinated program of generic promotion, consumer information and related research designed to drive consumption of honey and honey products in the U.S.

For more information about the National Honey Board, visit the National Honey Board AMS webpage page or visit their website at honey.com.

Since 1966, Congress has authorized the development of industry-funded research and promotion boards to provide a framework for agricultural industries to pool their resources and combine efforts to develop new markets, strengthen existing markets and conduct important research and promotion activities.  The Agricultural Marketing Service provides oversight of 22 boards, paid for by industry assessments, which helps ensure fiscal accountability and program integrity.

https://www.ams.usda.gov/content/honey-industry-votes-continue-research-and-promotion-program

TheWestAustralianLogo.png

NSW keepers must kill bees to get payments

WestAustralianPic1.jpg

Phoebe LoomesAAP

Sun, 4 September 2022 7:34PM

Compensation to support NSW beekeepers through a deadly parasite outbreak will not be issued until the affected bees have been euthanised.

The varroa mite that attacks and feeds on honey bees was detected near Newcastle in June, prompting the creation of emergency eradication and surveillance zones.

As the government worked to trace and remove the parasite, some 97 infected premises were detected around the Hunter, Narrabri and Coffs Harbour areas by mid August.

Bees are vital to pollination, with billions of dollars worth of crops threatened if it doesn’t occur.

Honey bee colonies within eradication zones have to be euthanised and this must be reported to the Department of Primary Industries. The hives must also be inspected and managed by officials.

An $18 million federal-state government support package was announced in July and NSW Agriculture Minister Dugald Saunders says keepers are now being compensated for their bees, hives, frames and other materials that had to be destroyed.

“You’re not getting paid before your bees have been euthanised but as that happens the compensation is available very quickly,” he told a budget estimates hearing on Monday.

“I understand it’s difficult if you’re looking at income and you haven’t had any income.”

The amount of compensation was negotiated by the federal government after consulting with the Australian Honey Bee Industry Council, Mr Saunders said.

Additional support is in place for commercial beekeepers including compensation for fuel, income and honey production.

Recreational keepers who euthanised their hives are also eligible for up to $550 in compensation per hive or $200 if they retain the hive, only killing the bees.

Mr Saunders says his office is confident most recreational keepers in the emergency zones have been identified, after a few hundred people a day helped locate hives during the outbreak.

Recreational keepers had come on board to register their hives for the industry’s future sustainability, he said.

Last month NSW eased restrictions on some beekeepers, with those outside the emergency notification zones allowed to move bees and hives more freely.

To combat its own varroa incursion, Victoria introduced a statewide permit system for anyone bringing bee or bee products across its border last month, which will not be granted to people from NSW.

 

https://thewest.com.au/politics/nsw-keepers-must-kill-bees-to-get-payments-c-8122316

Earth.ComLogo.jpg

Pesticides impair the ability of bees to pollinate strawberries

earth.comPic3.jpg

ByErin Moody

Earth.com staff writer

Researchers from Lund University in Sweden have discovered that when bees consume the pesticide clothianidin on rapeseed flowers, they move more slowly than non-exposed bees. The experts also found that strawberries pollinated by the affected bees are smaller.

“We studied bees that ingested clothianidin, a pesticide that was previously used in rapeseed to control flea beetles. Our study indicates that the substance made the bees slower and impaired their ability to pollinate the strawberry flowers,” explained study lead author Lina Herbertsson.

The researchers conducted an experiment using 12 outdoor cages containing the bees and rapeseed plants. Half the cages had rapeseed plants treated with clothianidin, and the other half were not treated with the pesticide. 

The bees in the treated containers took more time to visit the same number of rapeseed flowers as the non-exposed bees. When they weighed the strawberries pollinated by the bees, researchers determined the strawberries pollinated by the exposed bees weighed less.

“Previous studies have shown that clothianidin affects wild bees negatively in terms of foraging speed, development and reproduction. Our results indicate that it can also impair the bees’ ability to pollinate strawberry flowers,” said Herbertsson.

Although the study is significant, the authors are careful not to jump to conclusions. “In our study, we did not identify the cause for the lower strawberry weight, and after only having performed a single study under rather special circumstances, we also don’t know if this is a general pattern,” explained Herbertsson.

“Although clothianidin is now banned, other substances that affect the nervous system of insects in a similar way have partly replaced it. It is therefore of the utmost importance to continue this research and investigate how these substances affect bee behavior and pollination.”

This study can be found in the journal PLoS ONE.

https://www.earth.com/news/pesticides-impair-the-ability-of-bees-to-pollinate-strawberries/

YahooNewsLogo.png

Queen Elizabeth’s Bees Had to Be Informed of Her Death in Accordance With Tradition

YahooNewsPic2.jpg

Even the royal bees are mourning the death of Queen Elizabeth II. In a new report from The Daily Mail, royal beekeeper John Chapple revealed that he was required to inform the royal hive at Buckingham Palace and Clarence House of Queen Elizabeth's passing in accordance with a tradition that dates back centuries. “I’m at the hives now and it is traditional when someone dies that you go to the hives and say a little prayer and put a black ribbon on the hive,” Chapple said.

In addition to informing them of the Queen's death, the official beekeeper also alerted the bees of their new master, King Charles III.

Chapple explained the process to the publication, saying, “You knock on each hive and say, ‘The mistress is dead, but don't you go. Your master will be a good master to you.’”

According to The Daily Mail, this tradition stems from a superstition that if the bees are not informed of the change in monarch, then they might stop producing honey, or even die. Chapple, who has been the royal beekeeper for 15 years, was clearly not going to be the one to let this custom fade away. “I was the Queen’s beekeeper and hopefully now I’ll get the job of being the King’s beekeeper,” he added.

In the past, it's been revealed that the palace has enough bees to provide the family with a year's supply of honey. On World Bee Day in 2020, the official royal family Instagram shared a post that explained, “Buckingham Palace is home to four Italian honey bee (Apis mellifera ligustica) hives. The bees live on an island in the Palace gardens and forage on a wealth of nectar plants, both native and exotic.”

It added, “During the season, the bees produce enough honey for the palace to be self-sufficient, with over 200 jars produced [in 2019]. The honey is used by Palace chefs throughout the year at Garden Parties and receptions, where it is served in honey madeleines, as a filling for chocolate truffles and in honey and cream sponge.”

Let's hope the bees understood Chapple's message loud and clear.

https://www.yahoo.com/video/queen-elizabeth-bees-had-informed-175200453.html

USITCLogo.jpg

Raw Honey from Argentina, Brazil, India, and Vietnam Injures U.S. Industry, Says USITC

May 11, 2022

News Release 22-058

Inv. No. 731-TA-1560-1562 and 731-TA-1564 (Final)

Contact: Jennifer Andberg, 202-205-1819

Raw Honey from Argentina, Brazil, India, and Vietnam Injures U.S. Industry, Says USITC

The United States International Trade Commission (USITC) today determined that a U.S. industry is materially injured by reason of imports of raw honey from Argentina, Brazil, India, and Vietnam that the U.S. Department of Commerce (Commerce) has determined are sold in the United States at less than fair value.

Chair Jason E. Kearns, Vice Chair Randolph J. Stayin, and Commissioners David S. Johanson, Rhonda K. Schmidtlein, and Amy A. Karpel voted in the affirmative. 

As a result of the Commission’s affirmative determinations, Commerce will issue antidumping duty orders on imports of this product from Argentina, Brazil, India, and Vietnam.

The Commission made a negative critical circumstances finding with regard to imports of this product from Argentina. The Commission made an affirmative critical circumstances finding with regard to imports of this product from Vietnam. 

The Commission’s public report Raw Honey from Argentina, Brazil, India, and Vietnam (Inv. Nos. 731-TA-1560-1562 and 731-TA-1564 (Final), USITC Publication 5327, May 2022) will contain the views of the Commission and information developed during the investigations.

The report will be available by June 20, 2022; when available, it may be accessed on the USITC website at: http://pubapps.usitc.gov/applications/publogs/qry_publication_loglist.asp.

 

UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION
Washington, DC 20436

FACTUAL HIGHLIGHTS

Raw Honey from Argentina, Brazil, India, and Vietnam
Investigation Nos.: 731-TA-1560-1562, 1564 (Final)

Product Description:  Honey is a sweet, viscous fluid produced from the nectar of plants and flowers which is collected by honeybees, transformed, and combined with substances of their own, and stored and left in honeycombs to mature and ripen. Raw honey is honey as it exists in the beehive or as obtained by extraction, settling and skimming, or straining.

Status of Proceedings:

  1. Type of investigation:  Final antidumping duty investigations.

  2. Petitioners:  American Honey Producers Association ("AHPA"), Bruce, South Dakota; and Sioux Honey Association ("SHA"), Sioux City, Iowa.

  3. USITC Institution Date:  Wednesday, April 21, 2021.

  4. USITC Hearing Date:  Tuesday, April 12, 2022.

  5. USITC Vote Date:  Wednesday, May 11, 2022.

  6. USITC Notification to Commerce Date:  Tuesday, May 31, 2022.
     

U.S. Industry in 2020:

  1. Number of U.S. producers:  approximately 30,000 to 60,000.

  2. Location of producers’ plants: North Dakota, South Dakota, California, Texas, Montana, Florida, Minnesota, and Michigan

  3. Production and related workers:  1,360.

  4. U.S. producers’ U.S. shipments:  $302 million.

  5. Apparent U.S. consumption:  $690 million.

  6. Ratio of subject imports to apparent U.S. consumption:  42.8 percent.
     

U.S. Imports in 2020:

  1. Subject imports:  $296 million.

  2. Nonsubject imports:  $93 million.

  3. Leading import sources:  Argentina, Brazil, India, Vietnam.

https://www.usitc.gov/press_room/news_release/2022/er0511ll1935.htm

What does this mean for beekeepers?

The decision will be transmitted to the Commerce Department, which will issue antidumping duty orders shortly. In addition, the Commission reached an affirmative critical circumstances determination against Vietnam. This means that U.S. Customs will collect antidumping duties on entries going back an additional 90 days prior to the preliminary antidumping duty determination—from August 28, 2020, forward. This is an important additional finding, and one that the Commission rarely makes.

 

These results should continue to ensure that the American honey producer gets the fair prices they deserve.

We truly appreciate all of the donations that we have received to cover legal fees.

The good fight isn’t over yet, however, and we still need your support.

To donate to the Antidumping Fund, please contact
Cassie Cox: cassie@ahpanet.com
281-900-9740

Or donate on our secure website:
https://www.ahpanet.com/donations-1

AHPALogo.jpg

AHPA App


As AHPA continues to work on behalf of all beekeepers, one of our initiatives is advocating with the FDA in Washington D.C. to update honey labeling guidelines.  As part of this effort, we need your help to collect pictures of honey labels from around the United States.  Our goal is primarily to find honey that is mislabeled according to current FDA guidelines.  Secondarily, we need examples of any labels which misrepresent country of origin or are purposefully confusing to consumers so that we can advocate for positive changes and updates. 

Search the App Store or Google Play for "AHPA app”.  We need to collect as many pictures from honey on the store shelf as possible.  Please take a few minutes to help collect this data.

The materials and information included in this newsletter are provided as a service to you and do not reflect endorsement by the American Honey Producers Association (AHPA). The content and opinions expressed within the newsletter are those of the authors and are not necessarily shared by AHPA. AHPA is not responsible for the accuracy of information provided from outside sources.

September 5, 2022

SavetheDate-InfoSoon.png
Golf Poster 2022-4a-.png

Letter from our Vice President

I know the AHPA Convention seems like a long time away but November 29 - December 3 will be here soon. This year’s convention will be at the Westin La Paloma Resort and Spa in Tucson, AZ. This is a beautiful hotel located at the edge of the Catalina mountains. In addition to the restaurants and amenities on site, the hotel is just a 5-minute drive from shopping and restaurants. The hotel has 10,000 feet of vendor space available, and I know Cassie will be sending out the standard vendor information soon. 

 

I think this is going to be a great convention and I’m excited to tell you about this year’s additional activity.  We’re hosting a golf tournament on November 29th!   The La Paloma Country Club (part of the resort) is a semi-private club that only allows its members and guests of the Resort to play its three 9-hole golf courses designed by Jack Nicklaus.  It’s a beautiful and extremely well-maintained course in the beautiful Sonoran Desert near the Catalina mountains.

 

This is a great opportunity to show your support for the AHPA and help us raise money for the antidumping legal fees. This will also be a great opportunity for members of your organization to get better acquainted with some of the AHPA members.

 

This will be an 18-hole 2-man scramble event starting at 1:00 PM on November 29th. The entry fee for individual players is $200 and includes use of the practice range, green fees with a cart (1 cart/team), and a player’s gift that includes golf balls. There will also be a hole-in-one contest with winners choice of forklift (HummberBee or Bobcat).  Prizes for 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place teams will be awarded, (depending on the total number of players). All proceeds will go to the AHPA Antidumping fund.

 

The AHPA cannot do this without your help, so we are asking you to participate in several ways.

  1. We need golfers.

  2. We need sponsors to cover the prizes

  3. We need sponsors to promote this activity.

 

Of course, we will always accept donations of any amount to the Antidumping fund and ask that you do what you can to support the industry that supports your business. 

 

We have several options available for you to sponsor the tournament.

 1. Corporate Sponsorship $1500 which includes:

  • 1 Custom Banner displayed during Tournament and AHPA Convention 

  • 1 Custom Pin Flag

  • Ads on GPS screen in golf cart

  • Ads on AHPA website and convention program

  • Company logo on the event banner

  • Entry fee for 3 players 

 

2. Business Sponsorship $1000 which includes:

  • 1 Custom Tee box sign (18”x24”) during Tournament and AHPA Convention

  • 1 Custom Pin Flag (alternate hole from tee sign) 

  • Ads on AHPA convention program

  • Company logo on the event banner

  • Entry fee for 2 players

 

3. Executive Sponsorships $500 includes your choice of one of the following:

  • 1 Custom Tee Box Sign 18"x24" displayed at Tee box

  • 1 Custom Pin Flag 24” x 14” flag can be attached to the pin at all golf courses in the US

  • Company logo on the event banner

 

4. Closest to the Pin Guaranteed Winner $300

  • 1 Custom Sign

  • Ad in AHPA Convention program

  • Winner receives 2 VIP Tickets for choice of NFL; MLB; NBA; NHL; College Sports; Concerts; Broadway shows; Musicals and more.

5. Individual Player

  • 18-Holes with Cart (one cart per team)

  • 6 Golf balls

  • GPS Equipped Cart

  • Two Person Scramble Format (no Professionals)

  • Chance to win a forklift (hole-in-one contest) 

  • Additional prizes 

 

The deadline for sponsors and players is October 4, 2022.   Please go to AHPA Antidumping Fund Golf Tournament (perfectgolfevent.com)  to register for the tournament. 

 

 

No matter the size your business, organization, or your skill level, we need your participation.

 

Please let me know if you have any questions.

 

Regards,

Steven Coy

AHPA Vice President

stevencoy@ahpanet.com

601-530-6440

NHBNewsHeader.jpg

Help Save the Honey Bees by Celebrating National Honey Month

NHBPic8.png

It’s September, which means it’s National Honey Month and the third year of our Honey Saves Hives program! So, what’s the buzz? Protecting honey bees has become increasingly important as these pollinators are crucial to maintaining the health of our ecosystem. Not only do they produce the all-natural honey we enjoy, but honey bees pollinate more than a third of the foods we eat, including many fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds.

To celebrate National Honey Month, we’ve partnered with Brandi Milloy, a food reporter, mother, and lifestyle expert, and Joshua Snyder, a father, baker and meal planner. Together, they’re helping to spread the word about how we can all help save hives, including the easiest way - purchasing honey and made-with-honey products!

We’ve also partnered with brands that share our common goal of supporting honey bees. Try one of their made-with-honey products and visit HoneySavesHives.com to learn more about how you can help honey bees.

Justin’s supports an on-the-go lifestyle while providing nutritious snacks, like Honey Almond Protein Bars, Honey Almond Butter and Honey Peanut Butter, that provide a great taste and convenient nutrition. The brand continues to join forces with the National Honey Board to help protect honey bees, as honey adds a touch of sweetness to their products and honey bees are responsible for pollinating almonds, the primary ingredient in their almond butter!

Mary’s Gone Crackers is the largest organic and gluten free cracker company in the United States using only whole, plant-based products that are free from wheat, nuts, eggs and dairy. The new Mary’s Gone Kookies are made with honey and come in chocolate, cinnamon and honey flavors, a snack that is not only good for our bodies, but also good for the planet and honey bee health.

Sprecher Brewery brews 20 different made-with-honey craft sodas, including the world-famous Sprecher Root Beer, utilizing honey from local beekeepers for wholesome, naturally sweetened sodas.

TEAKOE Fizzy Tea sets a foundation for healthy habits through brewing organic tea with botanicals and real fruit, like its made-with-honey Lemon + Raw Honey and Peach + Lavender teas. The brand is committed to incorporating honey as a natural source of sweetness and as a complementary flavor for tea.

This Saves Lives is a snack brand with a unique giving model that supplies lifesaving food packages to children around the world. Their made-with-honey line-up includes Beehive Jive Oats and Honey, Madagascar Vanilla Almond & Honey, Dark Chocolate Caramel and Dark Chocolate Sea Salt snack bars. Honey provides a warmth and depth of flavor that pairs nicely with the snack bars, along with all-natural sweetness.

Tillamook Country Smoker produces only quality meats since 1975, including its Honey Glazed Beef Jerky, which has a well-rounded and naturally sweet flavor thanks to honey, providing the ultimate salty-sweet bite.

https://honey.com/blog/help-save-the-honey-bees-by-celebrating-national-honey-month

NewsmaxLogo.jpg

Honeybee Venom Destroys Breast Cancer Cells

NewsMaxPic1.jpg

By Lynn Allison    |   Wednesday, 31 August 2022 11:24 AM EDT

Australian researchers discovered a compound in honeybee venom, called melittin, destroys two types of aggressive breast cancer cells. The compound was effective in killing both to hard-to-treat forms of breast cancer: triple-negative and HER2-enriched.

According to BBC News,  the scientists said their discovery was exciting, but that further testing is needed to establish its value in the real world. The American Cancer Society says that breast cancer is the second most common cancer in women in the U.S., just behind skin cancers. About 287,850 new cases of invasive breast cancer will be diagnosed in women this year, and 43,250 will die from the disease.

The study by the Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research in Western Australia was published in Nature Precision Oncology, a peer-reviewed journal. Previous research has found that bee venom has anti-cancer properties against other types of cancer, such as melanoma, leukemia, and pancreatic cancers, according to the authors of the study.

The scientists used venom from over 300 honeybees and bumblebees and the extract proved to be “extremely potent,” said Ciara Duffy who led the study. One concentration of the venom was found to kill breast cancer cells within an hour with minimal damage to other cells. But as the concentration of the venom increased, so did the toxicity.

The researchers found that using the melittin compound on its own was effective in “shutting down” or disrupting cell cancer growth, says BBC News. Melittin can also be synthetically produced, which may facilitate its use in fighting cancer in the future if further testing bears out the results of this study.

Read the rest of the article: https://www.newsmax.com/health/health-news/cancer-breast-honeybee/2022/08/31/id/1085408/

SaskTodayLogo.jpg

Insecticides impair a bee’s ability to move in a straight line

Even small amounts can impair use of visual motion information.

SasktodayPic1.jpg

SASKTODAY.ca Sep 2, 2022 10:11 AM

SASKATOON – Research conducted by former University of Saskatchewan (USask) doctoral student Dr. Rachel Parkinson (PhD) under the supervision of Dr. Jack Gray (PhD), professor of biology in the College of Arts and Science, has shown that even at sublethal quantities, insecticides impair a honeybee’s ability to move in a straight line.

The results show that after exposure to the insecticides sulfoxaflor and imidacloprid, the honeybees suffer an impaired optomotor response, which is an innate orienting behaviour using wide-field visual

motion information. Bees also use this type of visual information to calculate the distance they have travelled from the hive.
As a 2019 Grass Foundation Fellow, Parkinson carried out the experiments at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass. Bees were tethered above an air-supported ball, creating a bee-sized treadmill. The apparatus was set up in front of screens that showed moving vertical black lines to mimic movement in the real environment. The bee’s walking path on the ball was recorded and analyzed to show their resulting ability to control their movement.

“The significance of the research is that this study shows for the first time that the ability of bees to encode and respond to visual information is impaired by insecticides. Bees use the same type of visual information that we tested in walking bees during flight to stabilize themselves and navigate,” said Parkinson. “The next step will be to test whether flying bees experience the same impairments.”

The research, which was
recently published in Frontiers in Insect Science, also shows that exposure to these insecticides led to increased cell death in the brain of the bees and affected a key gene expression in the central nervous system involved in detoxification.

“The major concern is that – if bees are unable to overcome any impairment while flying – there could be profound negative effects on their ability to forage, navigate, and pollinate wildflowers and crops,” said Parkinson.

“Parkinson’s work adds to the growing body of evidence of the negative effects insecticides have on bees,” said Gray. “With a better understanding of these effects comes a better chance of survival for these beneficial insects.”

Learn more about how Parkinson studied the honeybees
in this feature from Frontiers in Science.

https://www.sasktoday.ca/highlights/insecticides-impair-a-bees-ability-to-move-in-a-straight-line-5757359

MyModernMetLogo.png

Japanese Shrine Creates Custom Water Sanctuary for Bees To Stay Hydrated

MyModernMetPic1.jpg

By Kirsten Miller on August 29, 2022

ees bless our planet in so many extraordinary ways. They are inspiring in their work ethic and organizational skills, and who doesn't love a delicious dollop of honey? In all that they do to pollinate our plants, these special insects feel the heat of hard work as much as we do. Luckily, there are some compassionate people who are trying to keep our buzzing buddies hydrated. In Japan, near Tokyo, Hitokotonushi Shrine has set up custom-made water fountains that look like tiny oases for the local hard-working bees.

Visitors to the shrine have basins of water on offer at the temizu-ya, a Shinto water ablution pavilion, for rehydration purposes. These water sanctuaries are replicated in miniature form in summer to accommodate the bees, giving them their own special place to cool off.

The little patches of bee sanctuaries are customized to accommodate the insect’s tiny but no less significant needs. The bees are kept hydrated and happy with gorgeously styled miniature landscapes that have

diminutive architectural structures, soft moss, and other surfaces suitable to climb. The tiny watering points give insects of all kinds enough landing spots to drink without the risk of drowning. Access to clean, refreshing water to drink allows the bees to stabilize the temperatures of their hives, dilute their honey, and feed their young bees.

Such care for all creatures is what Shinto tradition and values are about. Respect for nature and accommodating and revering all living creatures is embedded in the Shinto way of life. This careful insect innovation includes a special water fountain built just for the bees. Another advantage of creating these bee spaces is that inter-species irritations between humans and bees are avoided, and no one gets stung.

A sign is installed at the shrine for the human visitors to ease relations with the bees that reads: “To those using the temizu, honeybees in the neighborhood are currently coming to the shrine to drink water. We are now guiding the bees to their own exclusive water drinking spot. They have a very gentle disposition so they rarely sting. Please look over them warmly without provoking them.”

Read the rest of the article and see more photos here: https://mymodernmet.com/hitokotonushi-shrine-bee-water-sanctuary/

NerdistLogo.png

Bees Do the Wave to Defend Themselves and It Is Mesmerizing

NerdistPic1.jpg

by Melissa T. Miller

Aug 26 2022 • 10:13 AM

While many people would not want to see millions of bees at the same time, their synchronized movements are actually nothing short of beautiful. The ripple of bees, or bees doing the wave, is a response to the predatory threat of hornets hovering nearby. They move their abdomens in sync as a defensive wave that may confuse the hornets. But they end up looking more like people doing the wave in a stadium. It sounds like a stadium full of vuvuzelas too.

They bees create fluid-looking waves that ripple out like the aftermath of rocks thrown into a pond. But there’s no rocks involved. That would probably lead to a completely different situation. The video above shows huge combs of bees waving their bodies in unison and it’s quite a sight to behold.

We learned about this phenomenon on Boing Boing. It’s clearly something other people have known about for awhile. But, as with the BBC presenter in the video above, it’s a new and amazing behavior I had never seen before. But this isn’t the only bee behavior I’m happy to see only on YouTube and not in person. Whether that involves swarming cars in grocery store parking lots or screaming at murder hornets, I’m happy to learn see these moments through my computer screen. Though it is nice to know that bees really do always stick together. 

The colonies in the video look just like the honeycomb that Bill Murray, I mean Baloo, is interested in harvesting in the live-action version of The Jungle Book. I had also never seen beehives in that shape before seeing the movie. There’s always more to learn!

 

Watch the video: https://nerdist.com/article/video-of-bees-doing-the-wave-to-defend-themselves/

USITCLogo.jpg

Raw Honey from Argentina, Brazil, India, and Vietnam Injures U.S. Industry, Says USITC

May 11, 2022

News Release 22-058

Inv. No. 731-TA-1560-1562 and 731-TA-1564 (Final)

Contact: Jennifer Andberg, 202-205-1819

Raw Honey from Argentina, Brazil, India, and Vietnam Injures U.S. Industry, Says USITC

The United States International Trade Commission (USITC) today determined that a U.S. industry is materially injured by reason of imports of raw honey from Argentina, Brazil, India, and Vietnam that the U.S. Department of Commerce (Commerce) has determined are sold in the United States at less than fair value.

Chair Jason E. Kearns, Vice Chair Randolph J. Stayin, and Commissioners David S. Johanson, Rhonda K. Schmidtlein, and Amy A. Karpel voted in the affirmative. 

As a result of the Commission’s affirmative determinations, Commerce will issue antidumping duty orders on imports of this product from Argentina, Brazil, India, and Vietnam.

The Commission made a negative critical circumstances finding with regard to imports of this product from Argentina. The Commission made an affirmative critical circumstances finding with regard to imports of this product from Vietnam. 

The Commission’s public report Raw Honey from Argentina, Brazil, India, and Vietnam (Inv. Nos. 731-TA-1560-1562 and 731-TA-1564 (Final), USITC Publication 5327, May 2022) will contain the views of the Commission and information developed during the investigations.

The report will be available by June 20, 2022; when available, it may be accessed on the USITC website at: http://pubapps.usitc.gov/applications/publogs/qry_publication_loglist.asp.

 

UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION
Washington, DC 20436

FACTUAL HIGHLIGHTS

Raw Honey from Argentina, Brazil, India, and Vietnam
Investigation Nos.: 731-TA-1560-1562, 1564 (Final)

Product Description:  Honey is a sweet, viscous fluid produced from the nectar of plants and flowers which is collected by honeybees, transformed, and combined with substances of their own, and stored and left in honeycombs to mature and ripen. Raw honey is honey as it exists in the beehive or as obtained by extraction, settling and skimming, or straining.

Status of Proceedings:

  1. Type of investigation:  Final antidumping duty investigations.

  2. Petitioners:  American Honey Producers Association ("AHPA"), Bruce, South Dakota; and Sioux Honey Association ("SHA"), Sioux City, Iowa.

  3. USITC Institution Date:  Wednesday, April 21, 2021.

  4. USITC Hearing Date:  Tuesday, April 12, 2022.

  5. USITC Vote Date:  Wednesday, May 11, 2022.

  6. USITC Notification to Commerce Date:  Tuesday, May 31, 2022.
     

U.S. Industry in 2020:

  1. Number of U.S. producers:  approximately 30,000 to 60,000.

  2. Location of producers’ plants: North Dakota, South Dakota, California, Texas, Montana, Florida, Minnesota, and Michigan

  3. Production and related workers:  1,360.

  4. U.S. producers’ U.S. shipments:  $302 million.

  5. Apparent U.S. consumption:  $690 million.

  6. Ratio of subject imports to apparent U.S. consumption:  42.8 percent.
     

U.S. Imports in 2020:

  1. Subject imports:  $296 million.

  2. Nonsubject imports:  $93 million.

  3. Leading import sources:  Argentina, Brazil, India, Vietnam.

https://www.usitc.gov/press_room/news_release/2022/er0511ll1935.htm

What does this mean for beekeepers?

The decision will be transmitted to the Commerce Department, which will issue antidumping duty orders shortly. In addition, the Commission reached an affirmative critical circumstances determination against Vietnam. This means that U.S. Customs will collect antidumping duties on entries going back an additional 90 days prior to the preliminary antidumping duty determination—from August 28, 2020, forward. This is an important additional finding, and one that the Commission rarely makes.

 

These results should continue to ensure that the American honey producer gets the fair prices they deserve.

We truly appreciate all of the donations that we have received to cover legal fees.

The good fight isn’t over yet, however, and we still need your support.

To donate to the Antidumping Fund, please contact
Cassie Cox: cassie@ahpanet.com
281-900-9740

Or donate on our secure website:
https://www.ahpanet.com/donations-1

7.25.22-BCOctEvent22_2_Page_1.png
7.25.22-BCOctEvent22_2_Page_2.png
AHPALogo.jpg

AHPA App


As AHPA continues to work on behalf of all beekeepers, one of our initiatives is advocating with the FDA in Washington D.C. to update honey labeling guidelines.  As part of this effort, we need your help to collect pictures of honey labels from around the United States.  Our goal is primarily to find honey that is mislabeled according to current FDA guidelines.  Secondarily, we need examples of any labels which misrepresent country of origin or are purposefully confusing to consumers so that we can advocate for positive changes and updates. 

Search the App Store or Google Play for "AHPA app”.  We need to collect as many pictures from honey on the store shelf as possible.  Please take a few minutes to help collect this data.

The materials and information included in this newsletter are provided as a service to you and do not reflect endorsement by the American Honey Producers Association (AHPA). The content and opinions expressed within the newsletter are those of the authors and are not necessarily shared by AHPA. AHPA is not responsible for the accuracy of information provided from outside sources.