Latest News

April 19, 2021

CRITICAL BEEKEEPER ACTION ALERT

 

What’s Happening: APHIS plans to release 2 non-native pests (a moth & a beetle from China) to eventually eradicate the Tallow tree from the USA. Tallow has been in the USA since the 1700s and is an important source of nectar and pollen for up to a million beehives. This will negatively impact all scales of beekeepers nationwide. 

 

Why it Matters: Releasing a beetle from China & a moth (with the potential to jump hosts) to control the most bee friendly tree in the USA is the last thing our honeybees need right now. Tallow provides irreplaceable forage for spring build up in the south, tens of millions of pounds of honey, and accounts for up to 90% of all honey produced in some states. The loss of the tallow crop could permanently impact all scales of beekeepers nationwide as queen, nuc & package producers suffer the loss of critical forage. Operations will go out of business, and nationwide supply will be disrupted. The scale & threat of this impact cannot be overstated.  

 

What You Can Do: This is the last chance we have to stand up against this reckless attempt. Join with thousands of fellow beekeepers, almost every southern State Beekeeping Association, and both major National Beekeepers Associations to comment against the loss of one of the most critical sources of clean forage for bees. Comment as a concerned beekeeper, business owner, beekeeping club, or someone who opposes the intentional release of more insect pests from China. 

 

*The deadline has been extended to April 23*

 

Click Here for more information on sample letters

Click Here  to Submit Comments

AHPA Featured 
2020 Virtual Conference Speaker

SammyRamsey.jpg

Dr. Samuel Ramsey,
Research Fellow for the
USDA-ARS, Beltsville, MD

"Fight the Mite Thailand Edition:
Understanding the Mysterious Tropilaelaps Mite"


Become a member of AHPA today!
You must be a dues paying member of AHPA and registered
for a member’s account login in order to view the video on our website.

https://www.ahpanet.com/2020-virtual-conference-speakers

After Identifying Gaps in Previous Aid, USDA Announces ‘Pandemic Assistance for Producers’ to Distribute Resources More Equitably

 

USDA Reopens Program Sign-Up to a Larger Share of Producers with Plans to Expand Outreach and New Programming

 

Release & Contact Info

Press Release

Release No. 0056.21

Contact: USDA Press
Email:
press@usda.gov

 

WASHINGTON, March 24, 2021 — Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced today that USDA is establishing new programs and efforts to bring financial assistance to farmers, ranchers and producers who felt the impact of COVID-19 market disruptions. The new initiative—USDA Pandemic Assistance for Producers—will reach a broader set of producers than in previous COVID-19 aid programs. USDA is dedicating at least $6 billion toward the new programs. The Department will also develop rules for new programs that will put a greater emphasis on outreach to small and socially disadvantaged producers, specialty crop and organic producers, timber harvesters, as well as provide support for the food supply chain and producers of renewable fuel, among others. Existing programs like the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program (CFAP) will fall within the new initiative and, where statutory authority allows, will be refined to better address the needs of producers.

USDA Pandemic Assistance for Producers was needed, said Vilsack, after a review of previous COVID-19 assistance programs targeting farmers identified a number of gaps and disparities in how assistance was distributed as well as inadequate outreach to underserved producers and smaller and medium operations.

“The pandemic affected all of agriculture, but many farmers did not benefit from previous rounds of pandemic-related assistance. The Biden-Harris Administration is committed to helping as many producers as possible, as equitably as possible,” said Vilsack. “Our new USDA Pandemic Assistance for Producers initiative will help get financial assistance to a broader set of producers, including to socially disadvantaged communities, small and medium sized producers, and farmers and producers of less traditional crops.”

USDA will reopen sign-up for CFAP 2 for at least 60 days beginning on April 5, 2021. The USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) has committed at least $2.5 million to improve outreach for CFAP 2 and will establish partnerships with organizations with strong connections to socially disadvantaged communities to ensure they are informed and aware of the application process.

The payments announced today (under Part 3, below) will go out under the existing CFAP rules; however, future opportunities for USDA Pandemic Assistance will be reviewed for verified need and during the rulemaking process, USDA will look to make eligibility more consistent with the Farm Bill. Moving forward, USDA Pandemic Assistance for Producers will utilize existing programs, such as the Local Agricultural Marketing Program, Farming Opportunities Training and Outreach, and Specialty Crop Block Grant Program, and others to enhance educational and market opportunities for agricultural producers.

USDA Pandemic Assistance for Producers – 4 Parts Announced Today

 

Part 1: Investing $6 Billion to Expand Help & Assistance to More Producers

 

USDA will dedicate at least $6 billion to develop a number of new programs or modify existing proposals using discretionary funding from the Consolidated Appropriations Act and other coronavirus funding that went unspent by the previous administration. Where rulemaking is required, it will commence this spring. These efforts will include assistance for:

  • Dairy farmers through the Dairy Donation Program or other means:

  • Euthanized livestock and poultry;

  • Biofuels;

  • Specialty crops, beginning farmers, local, urban and organic farms;

  • Costs for organic certification or to continue or add conservation activities

  • Other possible expansion and corrections to CFAP that were not part of today’s announcement such as to support dairy or other livestock producers;

  • Timber harvesting and hauling;

  • Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and other protective measures for food and farm workers and specialty crop and seafood producers, processors and distributors;

  • Improving the resilience of the food supply chain, including assistance to meat and poultry operations to facilitate interstate shipment;

  • Developing infrastructure to support donation and distribution of perishable commodities, including food donation and distribution through farm-to-school, restaurants or other community organizations; and

  • Reducing food waste.


Part 2: Adding $500 Million of New Funding to Existing Programs

 

USDA expects to begin investing approximately $500 million in expedited assistance through several existing programs this spring, with most by April 30. This new assistance includes:

  • $100 million in additional funding for the Specialty Crop Block Grant Program, administered by the Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS), which enhances the competitiveness of fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture, and nursery crops.

  • $75 million in additional funding for the Farmers Opportunities Training and Outreach program, administered by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) and the Office of Partnerships and Public Engagement, which encourages and assists socially disadvantaged, veteran, and beginning farmers and ranchers in the ownership and operation of farms and ranches.

  • $100 million in additional funding for the Local Agricultural Marketing Program, administered by the AMS and Rural Development, which supports the development, coordination and expansion of direct producer-to-consumer marketing, local and regional food markets and enterprises and value-added agricultural products.

  • $75 million in additional funding for the Gus Schumacher Nutrition Incentive Program, administered by the NIFA, which provides funding opportunities to conduct and evaluate projects providing incentives to increase the purchase of fruits and vegetables by low-income consumers

  • $20 million for the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service to improve and maintain animal disease prevention and response capacity, including the National Animal Health Laboratory Network.

  • $20 million for the Agricultural Research Service to work collaboratively with Texas A&M on the critical intersection between responsive agriculture, food production, and human nutrition and health.

  • $28 million for NIFA to provide grants to state departments of agriculture to expand or sustain existing farm stress assistance programs.

  • Approximately $80 million in additional payments to domestic users of upland and extra-long staple cotton based on a formula set in the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 that USDA plans to deliver through the Economic Adjustment Assistance for Textile Mills program.


Part 3: Carrying Out Formula Payments under CFAP 1, CFAP 2, CFAP AA

 

The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021, enacted December 2020 requires FSA to make certain payments to producers according to a mandated formula. USDA is now expediting these provisions because there is no discretion involved in interpreting such directives, they are self-enacting.

  • An increase in CFAP 1 payment rates for cattle. Cattle producers with approved CFAP 1 applications will automatically receive these payments beginning in April. Information on the additional payment rates for cattle can be found on farmers.gov/cfap. Eligible producers do not need to submit new applications, since payments are based on previously approved CFAP 1 applications. USDA estimates additional payments of more than $1.1 billion to more than 410,000 producers, according to the mandated formula.

  • Additional CFAP assistance of $20 per acre for producers of eligible crops identified as CFAP 2 flat-rate or price-trigger crops beginning in April. This includes alfalfa, corn, cotton, hemp, peanuts, rice, sorghum, soybeans, sugar beets and wheat, among other crops. FSA will automatically issue payments to eligible price trigger and flat-rate crop producers based on the eligible acres included on their CFAP 2 applications. Eligible producers do not need to submit a new CFAP 2 application. For a list of all eligible row-crops, visit farmers.gov/cfap. USDA estimates additional payments of more than $4.5 billion to more than 560,000 producers, according to the mandated formula.

  • USDA will finalize routine decisions and minor formula adjustments on applications and begin processing payments for certain applications filed as part of the CFAP Additional Assistance program in the following categories:

    • Applications filed for pullets and turfgrass sod;

    • A formula correction for row-crop producer applications to allow producers with a non-Actual Production History (APH) insurance policy to use 100% of the 2019 Agriculture Risk Coverage-County Option (ARC-CO) benchmark yield in the calculation;

    • Sales commodity applications revised to include insurance indemnities, Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program payments, and Wildfire and Hurricane Indemnity Program Plus payments, as required by statute; and

    • Additional payments for swine producers and contract growers under CFAP Additional Assistance remain on hold and are likely to require modifications to the regulation as part of the broader evaluation and future assistance; however, FSA will continue to accept applications from interested producers.


Part 4: Reopening CFAP 2 Sign-Up to Improve Access & Outreach to Underserved Producers

 

As noted above, USDA will re-open sign-up for of CFAP 2 for at least 60 days beginning on April 5, 2021.

  • FSA has committed at least $2.5 million to establish partnerships and direct outreach efforts intended to improve outreach for CFAP 2 and will cooperate with grassroots organizations with strong connections to socially disadvantaged communities to ensure they are informed and aware of the application process.

 

Please stay tuned for additional information and announcements under the USDA Pandemic Assistance to Producers initiative, which will help to expand and more equitably distribute financial assistance to producers and farming operations during the COVID-19 national emergency. Please visit www.farmers.gov for more information on the details of today’s announcement.

USDA touches the lives of all Americans each day in so many positive ways. In the Biden-Harris administration, USDA is transforming America’s food system with a greater focus on more resilient local and regional food production, ensuring access to healthy and nutritious food in all communities, building new markets and streams of income for farmers and producers using climate-smart food and forestry practices, making historic investments in infrastructure and clean-energy capabilities in rural America, and committing to equity across the Department by removing systemic barriers and building a workforce more representative of America. To learn more, visit www.usda.gov.

#

USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer, and lender.

Smell ya later: Honeybees track their queens with scent maps

Pheromones are shared outward from bee to bee.

By Joel Shurkin | INSIDE SCIENCE

April 11, 2021, 4:02 AM

Honeybees can find their way back to their queen using a sophisticated form of the telephone game. Even after foraging for hours, they can smell the pheromones of the bees between them and their queen once they are within a few meters of the crowded hive. These pheromones relay messages to create a "global map" that tells them where to go.

Researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder used artificial intelligence and computer vision to trace both the position and travel direction of worker bees as they found their way home. They published their findings in March in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The best way to understand what the researchers found is to think of the famous St.

Crispin's Day speech ("We band of brothers") Henry V makes to his troops at Agincourt in Shakespeare's play. The English army had 10,000 soldiers; Henry had no public address system, and shouting to a crowd that size wouldn't work. Very few soldiers in such a big crowd would have actually heard his voice.

What real orators used before PA systems was human repeaters in the crowd -- people who shouted what the king or general said to people standing behind them. Those people in turn would repeat what they heard to people behind them, who would then relay it back, etc.

Orit Peleg, an assistant professor of computer science at Boulder, said that worker bees in a hive (the vast majority of bees) have to know where the queen is at all times because she is the sole source of eggs that keep the hive populated. "She is a machine to lay eggs," said Peleg.

Instead of shouting information, the queen extrudes her pheromones to the bees closest to her, and those bees, in turn, amplify the queen's scent, and flap the information to the bees behind them. The information is eventually disseminated all the way out, like to the outskirts of an army. This works up to several meters from the hive.

It's similar to the "telephone game," where kids whisper to each other in succession. But in the telephone game, much of the information is either lost or corrupted as it moves farther away from the source, Peleg said.

The bees apparently are better at it.

https://abcnews.go.com/Technology/smell-ya-honeybees-track-queens-scent-maps/story?id=76982601

Ancient pottery uncovers honey hunting in ancient West Africa

The first evidence for ancient honey hunting, locked inside pottery fragments from prehistoric West Africa, dating back some 3,500 years ago.

By Pranjal Mehar

April 14, 2021

 

Where available, honeybee hive products, including honey, beeswax, and brood. They have been of considerable importance to ancient communities, both as a nutritional source and for medicinal, cosmetic, and technological purposes.

Honey is essential insect-related food globally. It is a rare sweetener source, comprises 80–95% sugar (carbohydrate), several important vitamins and minerals, and components that act as preservatives.

It is not known how long humans have been exploiting bee products. As it is a rare source of sweetener for ancient people, there is very little surviving evidence for the honeybee‘s ancient human exploitation.

Scientists from the University of Bristol, with colleagues from Goethe University, Frankfurt, carried out a chemical analysis of more than 450 prehistoric potsherds from the Central Nigerian Nok culture. They wanted to determine the type of food ancient people used to cook in their pots.

The Nok people are known for their remarkable large-scale terracotta figurines and early iron production in West Africa, around the first millennium BC. Surprisingly, their analysis revealed that around one third of the pottery vessels used by the ancient Nok people were used to process or store beeswax.

Scientists identified the beeswax in pottery using a complex series of lipids, fats, oils, and the natural world’s waxes. The beeswax is probably present as a consequence of the processing (melting) of wax combs. The gentle heating of the pot leads to its absorption within the vessel walls.

Ancient people in Africa, such as the Efe foragers of the Ituri Forest, Eastern Zaire, who have historically relied on honey as their primary source of food, collecting all parts of the hive, including honey, pollen, and bee larvae, from tree hollows which can be up to 30 m from the ground, using smoke to distract the stinging bees.

Among the Okiek people of Kenya, who rely on the trapping and hunting of a wide variety of games, smoked meat is preserved with honey, being kept for up to three years. A number of the Nok pots contained chemical evidence for the presence of both beeswax and meat products.

Read the rest of the article here: https://www.techexplorist.com/ancient-pottery-uncovers-honey-hunting-ancient-west-africa/38701/

Happy World Bee Day from Princeton University Press! 

With World Bee Day just around the corner, Princeton University Press is offering members of the American Honey Producers Association a 30% discount on its complete list of award-winning bee field guides and reference books! Enter promo code BDAY on the PUP website to get 30% off through 7/31/21.  

Lead by the forthcoming Common Bees of Eastern North America by Joseph Wilson and Olivia Messinger Carril, Princeton's award-winning bee books have garnered praise due to their gorgeous illustrations, stunning close-up photos, and range of coveted authors. Joseph Wilson's previous book, The Bees in Your Backyard, won the 2017 PROSE Award alongside tremendous praise from experts in the field. Wilson even brought bees to a wider audience, once hosting a TEDx Talk that can be seen here. Advocating that "In order to truly save the bees, we first need to understand them", Wilson and Carril's Common Bees of Eastern North America, publishing this July, is an excellent resource for anyone interested in learning about bees.

 

Check out these titles Covered under their discount:

Common Bees of Eastern North America

Bumble Bees of North America

The Bees in Your Backyard

The Lives of Bees

The Solitary Bees

Honeybee Democracy

Following the Wild Bees

The Bee: A Natural History

AHPA App


As AHPA continues to work on behalf of all beekeepers, one of our initiatives is advocating with the FDA in Washington D.C. to update honey labeling guidelines.  As part of this effort, we need your help to collect pictures of honey labels from around the United States.  Our goal is primarily to find honey that is mislabeled according to current FDA guidelines.  Secondarily, we need examples of any labels which misrepresent country of origin or are purposefully confusing to consumers so that we can advocate for positive changes and updates. 

Search the App Store or Google Play for "AHPA app”.  We need to collect as many pictures from honey on the store shelf as possible.  Please take a few minutes to help collect this data.

The materials and information included in this newsletter are provided as a service to you and do not reflect endorsement by the American Honey Producers Association (AHPA). The content and opinions expressed within the newsletter are those of the authors and are not necessarily shared by AHPA. AHPA is not responsible for the accuracy of information provided from outside sources.

April 5, 2021

CRITICAL BEEKEEPER ACTION ALERT

 

What’s Happening: APHIS plans to release 2 non-native pests (a moth & a beetle from China) to eventually eradicate the Tallow tree from the USA. Tallow has been in the USA since the 1700s and is an important source of nectar and pollen for up to a million beehives. This will negatively impact all scales of beekeepers nationwide. 

 

Why it Matters: Releasing a beetle from China & a moth (with the potential to jump hosts) to control the most bee friendly tree in the USA is the last thing our honeybees need right now. Tallow provides irreplaceable forage for spring build up in the south, tens of millions of pounds of honey, and accounts for up to 90% of all honey produced in some states. The loss of the tallow crop could permanently impact all scales of beekeepers nationwide as queen, nuc & package producers suffer the loss of critical forage. Operations will go out of business, and nationwide supply will be disrupted. The scale & threat of this impact cannot be overstated.  

 

What You Can Do: This is the last chance we have to stand up against this reckless attempt. Join with thousands of fellow beekeepers, almost every southern State Beekeeping Association, and both major National Beekeepers Associations to comment against the loss of one of the most critical sources of clean forage for bees. Comment as a concerned beekeeper, business owner, beekeeping club, or someone who opposes the intentional release of more insect pests from China. 

 

*The deadline has been extended to April 23*

 

Click Here for more information on sample letters

Click Here  to Submit Comments

The 2020-2021 Annual Loss and Management Survey is live!

The Bee Informed Partnership team, in collaboration with the Auburn University Bee Lab, are enthusiastically inviting all U.S. beekeepers to take part in this year’s survey. The survey is open from April 1 to April 30, 2021.

 

Take the Survey Today!

 

The BIP survey is the longest national effort to monitor honey bee mortality rates in the U.S. The Loss survey was initiated in 2006 by the Apiary Inspectors of America. Then in 2010 the Management section was added in collaboration with the vanEngelsdorp Bee Lab at the University of Maryland. The survey not only estimates the level of colony mortality in the country, but also allows us to identify management practices that are linked to colony mortality.

 

This year, a few things are new to the survey!

 

  • Shortened management section focused on Queens and New colonies


In response to beekeeper feedback, we shortened the management section by focusing on two important

topics this year – Queens and New Colonies. Next year we will focus on another important topic.

 

  • Both Small-scale AND Commercially-minded survey versions

 

Commercial beekeepers and small-scale beekeepers use different shorthand and keep records differently. They also can manage colonies differently. We created two versions of the survey to capture loss and management information in a format that fits each group best, working with a panel of beekeepers for input.

 

Both versions previews are available at beeinformed.org/take-survey/. Don’t hesitate to print your version in advance of taking the survey online so that you can be prepared for our inquisitive questions.

 

Just so that you know – your participation in the Survey is confidential. No personally identifiable information will be disclosed in any publication or presentation resulting from this research.

 

We rely on word of mouth to reach as many beekeepers as possible. Please share the survey announcement far and wide with your beekeeping friends and local clubs!

 

Thanks so much for your participation!

 

Sincerely, The Loss and Management Survey Team

HONEY TESTING LABS

Search for honey testing laboratories that will test honey for purity or economic adulteration on the National Honey Board's website!

This list does not constitute an endorsement, recommendation, or guarantee, nor is it all-inclusive.


https://honey.com/honey-industry/regulation/honey-testing-labs

 

 

Testing For Pure Honey

Roger Simonds at USDA AMS Honey Testing Lab, is requesting industry members to send him pure honey samples and syrup/feed samples. As AMS is developing its new LC-HRMS honey analytics, they want to collect as many reference samples as possible. 

Form for sending pure honey sample here

Form for sending syrup sample here.

 

https://honey.com/honey-industry/regulation/honey-testing-labs

Toxic impact of pesticides on bees has doubled, study shows

Analysis contradicts claims that the environmental impact of pesticides is falling, say scientists

The toxic impact of pesticides on bees and other pollinators has doubled in a decade, new research shows, despite a fall in the amount of pesticide used.

Modern pesticides have much lower toxicity to people, wild mammals and birds and are applied in lower amounts, but they are even more toxic to invertebrates. The study shows the higher toxicity outweighs the lower volumes, leading to a more deadly overall impact on pollinators and waterborne insects such as dragonflies and mayflies.

The scientists said their work contradicts claims that declines in the amount of pesticides used is reducing their environmental impact. The research also shows that the toxic impact of pesticides used on genetically modified crops remains the same as conventional crops, despite claims that GM crops would reduce the need for pesticides.

The research is based on the use and toxicity of 380 pesticides applied in the US from 1992 to 2016. The scientists said the same trend of lower volumes but greater toxic impact is likely for many regions in the world, but open-access data on pesticide use is not available in the EU, Latin America, China or Russia.

Pesticides are one factor cited by scientists for the plunging populations of some insects. Insects play vital roles in the ecosystems that sustain humanity, in particular by pollinating three-quarters of crops.

“Compounds that are particularly toxic to vertebrates have been replaced by compounds with less vertebrate toxicity and that is indeed a success,” said Prof Ralf Schulz, of the University Koblenz and Landau in Germany, who led the research. “But at the same time, pesticides became more specific, and therefore, unfortunately, also more toxic to ‘non-target organisms’, like pollinators and aquatic invertebrates.”

Schulz said: “GM crops were introduced using the argument that they would reduce the dependency of agriculture on chemical pesticides. This is obviously not true if you look at toxicity levels.”

Read the rest of the article here: https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/apr/01/toxic-impact-of-pesticides-on-bees-has-doubled-study-shows

Team identifies inflammation-fighting nanoparticles in honey

by Scott Schrage, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Sugars make up about 95% of honey, explaining how the substance became synonymous with sweetness and a food staple of bee colonies, which repeatedly digest and regurgitate flower nectar to produce it.

But people have also historically used honey as an ointment, hinting at anti-inflammatory properties that researchers are now investigating. Some of that research suggests honey can act on a protein called NLRP3, which triggers beneficial inflammation during immune responses but has also been implicated in diabetes, Alzheimer's and other diseases.

A multidisciplinary team of Nebraska researchers, led by Jiujiu Yu, went searching for overlooked components of honey that could help explain its anti-inflammatory activity. When they did, they found so-called extracellular vesicles: tiny membrane-protected particles that often carry proteins, ribonucleic acids and other biomolecules from one cell to another and have been identified in many foods.

The honey-housed vesicles contained 142 proteins from plants and 82 from honey bees, consistent with a nanoparticle produced by a flower, then consumed and regurgitated by the bees.

To test whether the vesicles themselves help combat inflammation, the team placed them alongside white blood cells that produce the inflammation-triggering NLRP3 protein, then kickstarted inflammatory processes. The vesicles substantially reduced the production and secretion of multiple inflammation-causing proteins, along with the inflammation-related death of certain cells. And when the team injected mice with the vesicles, it found that the nanoparticles partly alleviated both inflammation and drug-induced liver injury.

The researchers identified microribonucleic acids, or microRNAs, as the main anti-inflammatory cargo within the vesicles, even pinpointing a particular microRNA most responsible for the effects.

Further studies would need to establish whether and how vesicles consumed via honey actually curb inflammation in people, the researchers said. Studying how they interact with bacteria in the human gut could be a worthwhile starting point.

https://phys.org/news/2021-04-team-inflammation-fighting-nanoparticles-honey.html

How bees and drones team up to find landmines

By Chris Baraniuk
Technology of Business reporter

Tens of thousands of landmines are thought to remain after the Balkans war

Among the virtues of bees you may not be aware of is their knack for detecting bombs.

Thanks to the fact that they can pick up the scent of explosives with their antennae, researchers in countries such as Croatia have spent years perfecting how to use bees as landmine locators.

But there's a problem. As the insects whizz merrily about a mine-contaminated area, it's extremely difficult for humans to keep track of where they go, not least because chasing bees across a minefield is not a great idea.

That's where the drones come in. A team from Bosnia and Herzegovina and Croatia have come up with a way of using drones to monitor the bees while they work. The unmanned aerial vehicles fly around, capturing footage of the insects, which is later analysed by computers to reveal where landmines may be hidden in the ground.

Landmines buried during wars that happened decades ago continue to present a deadly threat in many parts of the world. Many thousands were planted during the Balkans war of the 1990s and many persist today.

There are an estimated 80,000 landmines in Bosnia and Herzegovina and a further 30,000 or so in Croatia. Clearing the devices is seen as a long-term, arduous project with no easy solutions. But technological innovations could still make a difference.

"We wanted to try to exclude humans from potential danger… and try to use drones," says Vladimir Risojević from the University of Banja Luka in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Previously, another team of fellow researchers had honed a method for training bees in landmine detection. They achieved this by getting the bees to associate the smell of TNT with food - a sugar solution.

In the field, the trained bees tend to cluster near to places where mines are buried, in the hope of finding food.

Such efforts have been active for many years but Prof Risojević says he and his team realised that computers could help by automatically analysing footage of the mine-seeking bees, in order to plot their activity and more easily locate the mines.

Even this proved tricky.

"It's very difficult for human observers to find these flying bees in this video footage let alone computer vision systems," he says.

"There were moments when I thought that we are outright crazy for trying to do that but I am pleasantly surprised with the results that we obtained."

Read the rest of the article here: https://www.bbc.com/news/business-56344609

Disabled Veterans To Beekeepers (DVTB)

Donald Schafer is organizing this fundraiser.

GoFundMeButton.png

Hello. My name is Donald. I’m a disabled Veteran. Like many disabled Veterans I have suffered with physical limitations which has caused emotional issues such as ptsd, anxiety and depression. Like most veterans we have lost the connections of belonging to something. The feeling of making a difference. Well a couple years back I started working with bees and noticed how much like the military they really are. Believe it or not, it helped me. I felt like I was part of that team, that well oiled military machine. My ultimate goal is to create starter kits for other Veterans and to regrow the bee population because as we all know , bees are close to extinction and without bees we lose so much. For example they pollinate fruits and vegetables and many other plants which remove carbon dioxide from the air and create oxygen. If the bees die that could literally mean the extinction of the human race and many other creatures that are among this earth. Please help me to help other veterans as well as other species of this earth. Let’s all become a well oiled machine and continue to prosper. This year with the donation of 5 dollars or more I will include a 3d printed Honey Bee Keychain. Thank you.

46 Bee Puns Worth Buzzing About

Chloë Nannestad

Apr. 02, 2021

Don't worry, bee punny!

Did you know that bee puns are good for your health? It’s true: They give you a dose of vitamin Bee! OK, we’re pollen your leg. But if you like bees, honey, or laughing at bad jokes, we’ve got the ultimate list of puns to make you chuckle.

Bee jokes

1. What’s black and yellow and flies at 30,000 feet?

A bee on an airplane.

 

2. What buzzes, is black and yellow, and goes along the bottom of the sea?

A bee in a submarine.

 

3. What do you call a bee that can’t quit talking?

Blabb-bee.

 

4. What is small, black and yellow, and drops things?

A fumble bee.

 

5. What do bees chew?

Bumble gum!

 

6. What do you call a bee with messy hair?

A Frizz-bee.

 

7. What goes zzub-zubb when it travels?

A bee flying backwards.

 

8. What do unionized bees ask for?

More honey and shorter working flowers.

 

9. If there’s a bee in my hand, what’s in my eye?

Beauty. Beauty is in the eye of the bee-holder.

 

10. What does a bee use to style her hair?

Her honey comb, of course.

 

Click here for many more: https://www.rd.com/article/bee-puns/

AHPA App


As AHPA continues to work on behalf of all beekeepers, one of our initiatives is advocating with the FDA in Washington D.C. to update honey labeling guidelines.  As part of this effort, we need your help to collect pictures of honey labels from around the United States.  Our goal is primarily to find honey that is mislabeled according to current FDA guidelines.  Secondarily, we need examples of any labels which misrepresent country of origin or are purposefully confusing to consumers so that we can advocate for positive changes and updates. 

Search the App Store or Google Play for "AHPA app”.  We need to collect as many pictures from honey on the store shelf as possible.  Please take a few minutes to help collect this data.

The materials and information included in this newsletter are provided as a service to you and do not reflect endorsement by the American Honey Producers Association (AHPA). The content and opinions expressed within the newsletter are those of the authors and are not necessarily shared by AHPA. AHPA is not responsible for the accuracy of information provided from outside sources.

American Honey
Producers Association

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Cassie Cox
Executive Secretary
PO Box 435
Mendon, UT 84325
office:281-900-9740
cassie@ahpanet.com